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Het jammere aan Vim is: het heeft een enorme leercurve, en de eerste keer dat je daadwerkelijk een paar seconden hebt bespaard omdat je je het perfecte commando herinnerde, ben er je minutenlang over aan het opscheppen tegenover andere Vim-gebruikers. #vim

So of course your editor does this too, but I just ran ag -l Hidden: | xargs vim and :argdo %s/^Hidden: true/Visibility: hidden/ and :argdo write (and the same for ag -l Private: | xargs vim and :argdo %s/^Private: true/Visibility: private/) on my content/ folder and it feels great.

Vim and Git

So I woke up this morning and thought: I should really dig more into using Git within Vim with tpope's vim-fugitive. So I did.

I was already using the :Gblame command it provides a lot. This command opens a vertical split, with on the right the current file and on the left for each line of that file the hash, author and date of the last time that line changed. This is great for quickly identifying the author and age of a piece of code, which helps me a great deal in understanding the purpose behind the code. It's sad that Git gives this feature a name with such a negative connotation. PHPStorm calls this 'Git annotate', which feels nicer. One can also do a git blame from the command line or on Github, but having this command right in your editor is very useful.

I noticed, however, that I can browse the commits even further, by pressing enter when the cursor was on such a line in the righthand buffer. I would instantly be lost in weird screens about commits. I also figured there would be ways to commit from Vim (what a Git plugin would it be else), but I hadn't figured out how it worked.

I think the best tour of the plugin, apart from it's help files, is this nice overview of five video's on Vimcasts.org, about the basic commands, the difference between committed files, the working copy and the index, resolving merge conflicts and other diffs, using Vim to browse Git and specificly browsing commit history. Recommended when diving into this, I learned a lot about the inner workings of Git too :)

Quick Vim thing that was useful to me: I was editing a .env file and added a comment for other readers, to point out that they should look at config/filesystems.php for more information. Then I thought, is that the right file? So I put my cursor on it and pressed gf, which opened the file, confirmed that it was the right file, and pressed Ctrl-O to get back.

So at one point I proudly admitted to a co-worker that I knew how to search and replace in Vim: I did /foo, then ciw, bar, and escape (changing the inner word to 'bar', or whatever the right replacement motion would be) and then press n and . for the number of times I needed to (first one goes to the next occurrence of 'foo', and the period key repeats the last edit, which is magic and very powerful in itself).

He replied with a less interesting, but in some cases more appropriate way of doing it: :%s/foo/bar/gc. This command takes the current file (%), and substitutes 'foo' for 'bar', with a flag for global (more than once) and choice. Vim will then stop at each 'foo' and gives you choices for 'y' or 'n' (and others), so you can interactively pick your replacements.

Today I leaned about the gn text object. Where iw stands for 'inner word', gn stands for 'go next'. So one can type /foo, then cgn, bar, and escape, which is almost the same. But then you can just keep hitting ., and it will perform the last action on the next occurrence of 'foo'. No need for n anymore!

I mean if you want to be presented with a choice for each replacement, go use :%s, but this gn thing is darn cool.

Maybe I should start a Vim-log of things I encounter and find useful. Most of them seem too advanced for the beginner and too trivial for the expert, but who's really an expert at Vim, aren't we all beginners for some part of it?


So, today I learned about the :cd command, which I instantly memorized (for it's just Unix). It changes the home directory of Vim, (by default this is the folder you start Vim in).

For example, if you're at ~/code and you want to check the contents of some file in my Seblog-project, I would do vim seblog/site/config/config.php. But as always, I need to check another file, so I use :e (short for :edit) to open that file, but because I was in ~/code when I opened Vim, I need to type: :e seblog/site/config/other-file.php. I find that annoying, so I would close Vim altogether, cd seblog and then vim ..

Now, I would just :cd seblog and then :e site/config/other-file.php. Or use :Ex (for :Explore) if I wanted to look around, but I knew that one already.